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Mountainbiking

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Hiking in

Ftan
Jakobsweg Graubünden
Jakobsweg Graubünden
Stage 4, Scuol–Guarda
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Via Engiadina
Via Engiadina
Stage 9, Ardez–Alp Valmala–Alp Laret, Natèas–Ftan, Prui
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Via Engiadina
Via Engiadina
Stage 10, Ftan, Prui–Motta Naluns–Vastur–Tuffaloras–Sent
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Cycling in

Ftan
Graubünden Route
Graubünden Route
Stage 4, Zernez–Martina
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Inn-Radweg
Inn-Radweg
Stage 3, Guarda–Martina
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Mountain biking in

Ftan
Alpine Bike
Engiadina Bassa
Engiadina Bassa
Nationalpark Bike-Marathon
Nationalpark Bike-Marathon
Tarasp
Avrona Bike
Natèas Bike
Scuol
Ftan

Ftan

The people from Ftan are known in the valley as «il muois da Ftan» – cattle from Ftan. Legend has it that they are extremely bull-headed. Perhaps that's why the tiny village still has reminders of a time when the Engadin belonged to Austria and Graubunden nut cake was first invented.
Until the 19th century, the most important traffic route to the Engadin led along the terrace north of the River Inn, where Ftan also lies. Traces of human habitation have been found dating back as far as nine thousand years BC. Roman trading routes also passed through this region, as finds in Val Tasna testify. Ftan is first mentioned in references to the parish in 1492.

Today's Hochalpine (high-Alpine) Institute Ftan was founded in 1793. The founder of the institute was Protestant minister Andrea Rosius à Porta, who spent 14 years in France as a private tutor and military chaplain. He returned to Ftan after the French Revolution, wanting to bring order to the education system. Until its closure in 1869, the institute offered its pupils a broad education with a Christian background.

The construction of the valley road through the Inntal in 1862 put Ftan off the beaten track and the period up to the First World War was marked by an extensive rural exodus. Even its own, although remote, Rhaetian Railway station brought little change. It was only possible to stem emigration to a certain extent with the reopening of the institute in 1916 as the Hochalpines Töchter-Institut (High-Alpine Girls' Institute). Today's school building was built during the years of the First World War.

Ftan has burned almost completely to the ground several times, however the Rontsch lanes still bear testament to the different architectural styles. To the north, original Engadin houses with their gables facing the road, opposite a row of stately Palazzi, built mostly by people returning with money made in the confectionary trade.

These Engadin confectioners were forced to travel afar for economic reasons and did not work as mercenaries but learned the trade of confectioner. The most well-known «leftover» is without doubt the Engadin nut cake, made with walnuts that do not even grow in the Engadin. The cake was originally made with expensive seeds from the cones of Swiss stone pine trees, but on their travels the Engadin confectioners discovered the cheaper walnuts. Successful emigrants would often return and build houses that reflected their wealth and showed that they had seen the world.

Highlights

  • Protestant church – the Protestant church dates from 1634. The free-standing church tower was given its characteristic double-onion dome after the last village fire in 1885.
  • Alp Laret – A half-day excursion from Ftan via three different routes through enchanting forests, clearings and past moss-covered rocks to Alp Laret above the treeline, from where you enjoy open views of the National Park.
  • Chanoua – the ruin of an ancient farm house is about 10 minutes away from Ftan along the Inn cycle path. Guided tours on request.
  • Ftaner Mühle – The old Ftan mill is located just outside the village centre. Guided tours on request.
The people from Ftan are known in the valley as «il muois da Ftan» – cattle from Ftan. Legend has it that they are extremely bull-headed. Perhaps that's why the tiny village still has reminders of a time when the Engadin belonged to Austria and Graubunden nut cake was first invented.
Until the 19th century, the most important traffic route to the Engadin led along the terrace north of the River Inn, where Ftan also lies. Traces of human habitation have been found dating back as far as nine thousand years BC. Roman trading routes also passed through this region, as finds in Val Tasna testify. Ftan is first mentioned in references to the parish in 1492.

Today's Hochalpine (high-Alpine) Institute Ftan was founded in 1793. The founder of the institute was Protestant minister Andrea Rosius à Porta, who spent 14 years in France as a private tutor and military chaplain. He returned to Ftan after the French Revolution, wanting to bring order to the education system. Until its closure in 1869, the institute offered its pupils a broad education with a Christian background.

The construction of the valley road through the Inntal in 1862 put Ftan off the beaten track and the period up to the First World War was marked by an extensive rural exodus. Even its own, although remote, Rhaetian Railway station brought little change. It was only possible to stem emigration to a certain extent with the reopening of the institute in 1916 as the Hochalpines Töchter-Institut (High-Alpine Girls' Institute). Today's school building was built during the years of the First World War.

Ftan has burned almost completely to the ground several times, however the Rontsch lanes still bear testament to the different architectural styles. To the north, original Engadin houses with their gables facing the road, opposite a row of stately Palazzi, built mostly by people returning with money made in the confectionary trade.

These Engadin confectioners were forced to travel afar for economic reasons and did not work as mercenaries but learned the trade of confectioner. The most well-known «leftover» is without doubt the Engadin nut cake, made with walnuts that do not even grow in the Engadin. The cake was originally made with expensive seeds from the cones of Swiss stone pine trees, but on their travels the Engadin confectioners discovered the cheaper walnuts. Successful emigrants would often return and build houses that reflected their wealth and showed that they had seen the world.

Highlights

  • Protestant church – the Protestant church dates from 1634. The free-standing church tower was given its characteristic double-onion dome after the last village fire in 1885.
  • Alp Laret – A half-day excursion from Ftan via three different routes through enchanting forests, clearings and past moss-covered rocks to Alp Laret above the treeline, from where you enjoy open views of the National Park.
  • Chanoua – the ruin of an ancient farm house is about 10 minutes away from Ftan along the Inn cycle path. Guided tours on request.
  • Ftaner Mühle – The old Ftan mill is located just outside the village centre. Guided tours on request.

Arrival and return Ftan

Adresse

Gäste-Info Ftan
Plaz 114
7551 Ftan
Tel. +41 (0)81 861 88 28
ftan@engadin.com
www.ftan.ch

Services

Accommodation

Camping Sur En
Camping Sur En
Sent
Chamanna Lischana CAS
Chamanna Lischana CAS
Scuol
Chamonna Tuoi CAS
Chamonna Tuoi CAS
Guarda
Ferienhof Pua
Ferienhof Pua
Sent
Hotel Altana
Hotel Altana
Scuol
Hotel Bellavista
Hotel Bellavista
Ftan
Hotel Conrad
Hotel Conrad
Scuol
Jugendherberge Scuol
Jugendherberge Scuol
Scuol
TCS Camping Scuol
TCS Camping Scuol
Scuol
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Places of interest

God da Tamangur
God da Tamangur
Schellen-Ursli's Home
Schellen-Ursli's Home
Seilpark Engadin
Seilpark Engadin
Tarasp Castel
Tarasp Castel
Town Cenre and Steinsberg Castle
Town Cenre and Steinsberg Castle
Val d'Uina Gorge
Val d'Uina Gorge
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Hiking in

Ftan
Jakobsweg Graubünden
Jakobsweg Graubünden
Stage 4, Scuol–Guarda
Show all
Via Engiadina
Via Engiadina
Stage 9, Ardez–Alp Valmala–Alp Laret, Natèas–Ftan, Prui
Show all
Via Engiadina
Via Engiadina
Stage 10, Ftan, Prui–Motta Naluns–Vastur–Tuffaloras–Sent
Show all

Cycling in

Ftan
Graubünden Route
Graubünden Route
Stage 4, Zernez–Martina
Show all
Inn-Radweg
Inn-Radweg
Stage 3, Guarda–Martina
Show all

Mountain biking in

Ftan
Alpine Bike
Engiadina Bassa
Engiadina Bassa
Nationalpark Bike-Marathon
Nationalpark Bike-Marathon
Tarasp
Avrona Bike
Natèas Bike