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Mountain biking in

Livigno (I)
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Nationalpark Bike-Marathon
Poschiavino Trail
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Livigno (I)

Livigno (I)

Livigno lies at an altitude of 1816 m in the Livigno Alps. The Italian village near the Swiss border is especially known for duty-free shopping. Actually the holiday resort has far more to offer than cheap schnapps and petrol.
Livigno lies on the River Spöl, which flows into the 9-km-long dammed Lago di Livigno and later, in the Engadine, into the Inn and thus the Danube. The valley is thus north of the Alpine watershed. The Passo di Foscagno (2291 m altitude), the road link to the nearest larger Italian town of Bormio ensures a link to Italy in winter, although this was first made possible in the 1950s. Before this Livigno was often cut off from the outside world for up to six months.

A little south of the Berninapass, the road branches on the Swiss side over the Forcola di Livigno. In just a few turns the road, which is only open in summer, crosses the head of the pass at 2315 m altitude and continues on to Livigno. The valley is also accessed from Switzerland through the Munt La Schera toll tunnel, built in the 1960s and reached by branching off the road between Zernez and the Ofenpass. After the single-file tunnel, with alternating traffic directions – a bottleneck on winter weekends – the road follows the lengthy Lago di Livigno reservoir to Livigno.

The Livigno Valley has been inhabited since 1000 AD. In the 17th century, Livigno was granted legal and economic autonomy by the Graubunden rulers of the Veltlin. In 1805, because of the exposed position and inaccessibility in winter, Napoleon declared Livigno a duty-free zone so that – because of its strategic importance – it remained inhabited throughout the year.

This status was recognized in 1818 by Austria-Hungary, in 1910 by Italy and finally also by the European Union in 1960. Numerous shops in the streets of Livigno offer alcohol, cigarettes, perfume etc. and filling stations beckon with cheap petrol. Between these however it has been possible to retain many traditional timber-stone buildings.

The national parks of Stilfserjoch and the Engadine attract hikers but mainly also mountain bikers to the region (e.g. bike tour over the Pass Chaschauna to S-chanf). However, Livigno comes into its own in the winter season: over 30 lift facilities provide access to over 100 km of runs on both sides of the valley, up to 2800 m altitude.

Highlights

  • National Parks – the two adjacent national parks, the Swiss and Stilfserjoch (Italy) form a huge nature reserve.
  • Duty-free area – entices many visitors with cheap petrol, alcohol and tobacco, rather than with the beauty of the valley.
Livigno lies at an altitude of 1816 m in the Livigno Alps. The Italian village near the Swiss border is especially known for duty-free shopping. Actually the holiday resort has far more to offer than cheap schnapps and petrol.
Livigno lies on the River Spöl, which flows into the 9-km-long dammed Lago di Livigno and later, in the Engadine, into the Inn and thus the Danube. The valley is thus north of the Alpine watershed. The Passo di Foscagno (2291 m altitude), the road link to the nearest larger Italian town of Bormio ensures a link to Italy in winter, although this was first made possible in the 1950s. Before this Livigno was often cut off from the outside world for up to six months.

A little south of the Berninapass, the road branches on the Swiss side over the Forcola di Livigno. In just a few turns the road, which is only open in summer, crosses the head of the pass at 2315 m altitude and continues on to Livigno. The valley is also accessed from Switzerland through the Munt La Schera toll tunnel, built in the 1960s and reached by branching off the road between Zernez and the Ofenpass. After the single-file tunnel, with alternating traffic directions – a bottleneck on winter weekends – the road follows the lengthy Lago di Livigno reservoir to Livigno.

The Livigno Valley has been inhabited since 1000 AD. In the 17th century, Livigno was granted legal and economic autonomy by the Graubunden rulers of the Veltlin. In 1805, because of the exposed position and inaccessibility in winter, Napoleon declared Livigno a duty-free zone so that – because of its strategic importance – it remained inhabited throughout the year.

This status was recognized in 1818 by Austria-Hungary, in 1910 by Italy and finally also by the European Union in 1960. Numerous shops in the streets of Livigno offer alcohol, cigarettes, perfume etc. and filling stations beckon with cheap petrol. Between these however it has been possible to retain many traditional timber-stone buildings.

The national parks of Stilfserjoch and the Engadine attract hikers but mainly also mountain bikers to the region (e.g. bike tour over the Pass Chaschauna to S-chanf). However, Livigno comes into its own in the winter season: over 30 lift facilities provide access to over 100 km of runs on both sides of the valley, up to 2800 m altitude.

Highlights

  • National Parks – the two adjacent national parks, the Swiss and Stilfserjoch (Italy) form a huge nature reserve.
  • Duty-free area – entices many visitors with cheap petrol, alcohol and tobacco, rather than with the beauty of the valley.

Arrival and return Livigno (I)

Adresse

Azienda Promozione Turistica
c/o Plaza Plachéda
23030 Livigno
Tel. +39 0342 052200
info@livigno.eu
www.livigno.eu

Services

Accommodation

Hotel Garni Oberrhein
Hotel Garni Oberrhein
Rheinfelden - Baden (D)
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Mountain biking in

Livigno (I)
Alpine Bike
Alpine Bike
Nationalpark Bike-Marathon
Nationalpark Bike-Marathon
Poschiavino Trail