95 Au fil du Doubs
95 Au fil du Doubs

Hiking

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Au fil du Doubs

Stage 4, Soubey–St-Ursanne

Route report
75 photos

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Au fil du Doubs

Just before St. Ursanne, the Doubs makes a sharp 180-degree arc as it if were unsure where to go. Perhaps this radical change of direction is the reason why the Romans called the meandering river the Doubs. The word comes from the Latin dubitus, the hesitant, the doubting.
In Soubey, a farming village at the bottom of the valley, you start the stage at the river. The river landscape is very popular with fishermen and canoeists as well. At the start, follow the right bank of the Doubs on the wider paths to "Bief du Moulin". Of the three mills, only one has been preserved. You pass by farms with cow and horse pastures and cross the river after a little over an hour. Now the riverbank scenery changes: small trails lead through the enchanting landscape along the Doubs. Moss and ivy-covered trees, reed fields, lush meadows, secluded places to linger and the view of the natural course of the river accompany the hiker. The Doubs usually flows sluggishly, only occasionally you can hear the sound of rapids.

After a little more than two hours, you will see the restaurant Tariche with its camping site on the opposite side of the river. Here you can cross the Doubs on a barge under your own power using a cable winch. One of the rarest fish species is found here: the apron, also called the King of the Doubs. A little later on, the path is replaced by an agricultural road. Soon a big hole in the mountain can be seen from far away: it is the old lime mine of St. Ursanne. At the end of the 1990s, it was believed that a solution for toxic waste had been found here, and the storage of hazardous waste began, although water was flowing through the mine. After many protests and proof of drinking water pollution, the landfill was closed.

When you reach the bridge under the hole shortly afterwards, the Doubs makes another 180-degree turn - as if it didn't know where to go. The radical change of direction may also be the reason why the Romans once called the meandering river Doubs. The word comes from the Latin "dubitus", the hesitant, doubting. St. Ursanne, also called the pearl of the Jura, is however undoubtedly beautiful. Numerous art galleries and antiquarian shops line the streets of this medieval town. You enter it on a bridge built in 1728, which then leads you directly to the end of the last stage of the Doubs hiking tour.
Just before St. Ursanne, the Doubs makes a sharp 180-degree arc as it if were unsure where to go. Perhaps this radical change of direction is the reason why the Romans called the meandering river the Doubs. The word comes from the Latin dubitus, the hesitant, the doubting.
In Soubey, a farming village at the bottom of the valley, you start the stage at the river. The river landscape is very popular with fishermen and canoeists as well. At the start, follow the right bank of the Doubs on the wider paths to "Bief du Moulin". Of the three mills, only one has been preserved. You pass by farms with cow and horse pastures and cross the river after a little over an hour. Now the riverbank scenery changes: small trails lead through the enchanting landscape along the Doubs. Moss and ivy-covered trees, reed fields, lush meadows, secluded places to linger and the view of the natural course of the river accompany the hiker. The Doubs usually flows sluggishly, only occasionally you can hear the sound of rapids.

After a little more than two hours, you will see the restaurant Tariche with its camping site on the opposite side of the river. Here you can cross the Doubs on a barge under your own power using a cable winch. One of the rarest fish species is found here: the apron, also called the King of the Doubs. A little later on, the path is replaced by an agricultural road. Soon a big hole in the mountain can be seen from far away: it is the old lime mine of St. Ursanne. At the end of the 1990s, it was believed that a solution for toxic waste had been found here, and the storage of hazardous waste began, although water was flowing through the mine. After many protests and proof of drinking water pollution, the landfill was closed.

When you reach the bridge under the hole shortly afterwards, the Doubs makes another 180-degree turn - as if it didn't know where to go. The radical change of direction may also be the reason why the Romans once called the meandering river Doubs. The word comes from the Latin "dubitus", the hesitant, doubting. St. Ursanne, also called the pearl of the Jura, is however undoubtedly beautiful. Numerous art galleries and antiquarian shops line the streets of this medieval town. You enter it on a bridge built in 1728, which then leads you directly to the end of the last stage of the Doubs hiking tour.
15 km
220 m | 260 m
3 h 45 min
easy (hiking trail) | easy

Arrival | return travel

Arrival / return travel Soubey, village
SBB Timetable Show stop and route on map
Arrival / return travel St-Ursanne
SBB Timetable Show stop and route on map

Contact

Signpost management
Signposting is managed by the cantonal hiking trail organisation on behalf of the canton. Lend a hand by becoming a member in your canton.
Become a member
Jura Rando
2800 Delémont
info@jurarando.ch
www.jurarando.ch

Services

Accommodation

Hôtel du Cerf
Hôtel du Cerf
Soubey
Hotel et Camping de Tariche
Hotel et Camping de Tariche
St-Ursanne
Eco-Chalet
Eco-Chalet
St-Ursanne
La Couronne
La Couronne
St-Ursanne
Le Chandelier et Camping de St-Ursanne
Le Chandelier et Camping de St-Ursanne
St-Ursanne
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Bookable offers

95 Au Fil Du Doubs
95 Au Fil Du Doubs
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Places

Soubey
Soubey
St-Ursanne
St-Ursanne
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Places of interest

Doubs Nature Park
Doubs Nature Park
Saint-Ursanne on the Doubs
Saint-Ursanne on the Doubs
St-Ursanne bridge
St-Ursanne bridge
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Signalization

Signalization
For hiking, follow the logo indicated on the yellow signposts. Take a printout of our web map on your hike for safety's sake.
Signalization