2 Trans Swiss Trail
2 Trans Swiss Trail
2 Trans Swiss Trail
2 Trans Swiss Trail
2 Trans Swiss Trail
2 Trans Swiss Trail

Hiking

etappe-01266

Trans Swiss Trail

Stage 2, St-Ursanne–Soubey

Route report
40 photos

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etappe-01266

Trans Swiss Trail

The Doubs is a moody, fascinating river. The hike along the south bank from St-Ursanne to La Charbonnière is almost always along nature trails, close to the shimmering, blue-green waters. Many dragonflies and birds inhabit the river banks.
St. Ursanne is a small medieval town and the third historic town in the canton of Jura after Delémont and Porrentruy. Town gates and town houses dating from the 14th to 16th centuries characterise the townscape. You leave St. Ursanne via the Doubs and the stone bridge built in 1728. A short time later, the river makes an abrupt change of direction. This may also be the reason why the Romans once called the meandering river the Doubs. The word comes from the Latin "dubitus" - the hesitant, the doubtful.

Further along the paved road, take a look back at the 44-metre-high railway viaduct with its 12 vaulted arches and a length of 237 metres. After La Lomène, the paved road turns into a gravel road. This section of the Doubs on Swiss territory is home to Switzerland's rarest fish: the apron, also known as the King of the Doubs. The population of this strictly protected species, which is only found in the catchment area of the Rhone, was estimated at 50 to 150 adult specimens in 2012. At the next loop, you change to a small path. After about one and a half hours, the campsite with its restaurant by the name of Tariche is located on the other side of the river. Here, you can cross the Doubs under your own steam by means of a winch and a skiff.

Secluded spots, lush meadows, trees entwined with ivy and moss invite you to linger along the route at Sous les Roches. You cross the bridge to change sides of the river again. A little later, the scenic path turns into a paved road. Passing "Bief du Moulin", the three mills, of which only one remains, you reach the village of Soubey a little later after just under four hours hiking time. The village centre is characterised by old houses dating from the 17th to 19th centuries. The Saint-Valbert parish church, built in 1632, is the only Swiss church north of the alps with a roof made of limestone slabs.
The Doubs is a moody, fascinating river. The hike along the south bank from St-Ursanne to La Charbonnière is almost always along nature trails, close to the shimmering, blue-green waters. Many dragonflies and birds inhabit the river banks.
St. Ursanne is a small medieval town and the third historic town in the canton of Jura after Delémont and Porrentruy. Town gates and town houses dating from the 14th to 16th centuries characterise the townscape. You leave St. Ursanne via the Doubs and the stone bridge built in 1728. A short time later, the river makes an abrupt change of direction. This may also be the reason why the Romans once called the meandering river the Doubs. The word comes from the Latin "dubitus" - the hesitant, the doubtful.

Further along the paved road, take a look back at the 44-metre-high railway viaduct with its 12 vaulted arches and a length of 237 metres. After La Lomène, the paved road turns into a gravel road. This section of the Doubs on Swiss territory is home to Switzerland's rarest fish: the apron, also known as the King of the Doubs. The population of this strictly protected species, which is only found in the catchment area of the Rhone, was estimated at 50 to 150 adult specimens in 2012. At the next loop, you change to a small path. After about one and a half hours, the campsite with its restaurant by the name of Tariche is located on the other side of the river. Here, you can cross the Doubs under your own steam by means of a winch and a skiff.

Secluded spots, lush meadows, trees entwined with ivy and moss invite you to linger along the route at Sous les Roches. You cross the bridge to change sides of the river again. A little later, the scenic path turns into a paved road. Passing "Bief du Moulin", the three mills, of which only one remains, you reach the village of Soubey a little later after just under four hours hiking time. The village centre is characterised by old houses dating from the 17th to 19th centuries. The Saint-Valbert parish church, built in 1632, is the only Swiss church north of the alps with a roof made of limestone slabs.
15 km
260 m | 220 m
3 h 50 min
easy (hiking trail) | easy

Arrival | return travel

Arrival / return travel St-Ursanne
SBB Timetable Show stop and route on map
Arrival / return travel Soubey, village
SBB Timetable Show stop and route on map

Contact

Signpost management
Signposting is managed by the cantonal hiking trail organisation on behalf of the canton.
Jura Rando
2800 Delémont
info@jurarando.ch
www.jurarando.ch

Services

Accommodation

La Couronne
La Couronne
St-Ursanne
Eco-Chalet
Eco-Chalet
St-Ursanne
Le Chandelier et Camping de St-Ursanne
Le Chandelier et Camping de St-Ursanne
St-Ursanne
Hotel et Camping de Tariche
Hotel et Camping de Tariche
St-Ursanne
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Bookable offers

2 Trans Swiss Trail: Porrentruy - Neuchâtel
2 Trans Swiss Trail: Porrentruy - Neuchâtel
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Places

St-Ursanne
St-Ursanne
Soubey
Soubey
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Places of interest

Saint-Ursanne on the Doubs
Saint-Ursanne on the Doubs
St-Ursanne bridge
St-Ursanne bridge
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Signalization

Signalization
For hiking, follow the logo indicated on the yellow signposts. Take a printout of our web map on your hike for safety's sake.
Signalization