56 Lötschberg-Panoramaweg
56 Lötschberg-Panoramaweg

Hiking

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Lötschberg-Panoramaweg

Stage 1, Kiental–Kandersteg

Route report
86 photos

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Lötschberg-Panoramaweg

High-level path in Alpine foothills from Kiental to Kandersteg. High above the Kandertal through forests and over Alpine pastures. Fascinating views down to the trains of the Lötschberg Railway, which roll through the Kandertal like a model railway.
Kiental is one of the large side valleys of the Kandertal Valley in the Bernese Oberland and located in the middle of an intact natural environment. The village of the same name is also the starting point of the chairlift to Ramslauenen. From Reichenbach in the Kandertal at the beginning of the Kiental valley, Europe’s steepest postbus route leads via Kiental village to Griesalp. Pochtenschlucht gorge, for example, has a gradient of up to 28%. During the ride, the environment changes from a lovely valley to a rugged high mountain landscape.

The hiking trail starts in Kiental, at the base station of the chairlift. The first 500 altitude metres of the tour are strenuous and take roughly 1 ½ hours, but once you have reached Ramslauenen, the worst is over. A beautiful path follows and leads through Horewald forest. A little later, above Chüeweid, the views of the Kandertal Valley open up with Niesen Mountain and its steep cog railway to the left, and down in the valley you can see the trains of the Lötschberg railway line. Part of Lake Thun is visible straight ahead and on the right are the grassy mountainsides of Beatenberg and the steep wall of Niederhorn peak. Continue on the pleasant paths through short sections of forest and meadows to get to Schlafegg after about two hours.

Shortly before the impressive notch of Bundergraben comes a precipitous passage, secured with ropes. But the path following the pleasant grilling place near Bundergraben is just delightful. It winds through a coniferous forest before it changes to an asphalt and gravel road. Again the views of the railway line and the Lötschberg trains down in the valley are fantastic. As they roll through the Kandertal they look almost like model trains. Because of the steepness, the train describes two big loops around the old Felsenburg ruins. The route continues downhill on forest paths and about one kilometre before Kandersteg it crosses the Kander. The 47 km long river originates at Kanderfirn and later flows through Lake Thun and into the Aare River. The name Kander comes from the Celtic word “kando” and means “white” or “shining”, a reference to the light cloudiness caused by the glacier’s meltwater. The route follows the course of the river and soon ends at today’s destination, the Kandersteg railway station.
High-level path in Alpine foothills from Kiental to Kandersteg. High above the Kandertal through forests and over Alpine pastures. Fascinating views down to the trains of the Lötschberg Railway, which roll through the Kandertal like a model railway.
Kiental is one of the large side valleys of the Kandertal Valley in the Bernese Oberland and located in the middle of an intact natural environment. The village of the same name is also the starting point of the chairlift to Ramslauenen. From Reichenbach in the Kandertal at the beginning of the Kiental valley, Europe’s steepest postbus route leads via Kiental village to Griesalp. Pochtenschlucht gorge, for example, has a gradient of up to 28%. During the ride, the environment changes from a lovely valley to a rugged high mountain landscape.

The hiking trail starts in Kiental, at the base station of the chairlift. The first 500 altitude metres of the tour are strenuous and take roughly 1 ½ hours, but once you have reached Ramslauenen, the worst is over. A beautiful path follows and leads through Horewald forest. A little later, above Chüeweid, the views of the Kandertal Valley open up with Niesen Mountain and its steep cog railway to the left, and down in the valley you can see the trains of the Lötschberg railway line. Part of Lake Thun is visible straight ahead and on the right are the grassy mountainsides of Beatenberg and the steep wall of Niederhorn peak. Continue on the pleasant paths through short sections of forest and meadows to get to Schlafegg after about two hours.

Shortly before the impressive notch of Bundergraben comes a precipitous passage, secured with ropes. But the path following the pleasant grilling place near Bundergraben is just delightful. It winds through a coniferous forest before it changes to an asphalt and gravel road. Again the views of the railway line and the Lötschberg trains down in the valley are fantastic. As they roll through the Kandertal they look almost like model trains. Because of the steepness, the train describes two big loops around the old Felsenburg ruins. The route continues downhill on forest paths and about one kilometre before Kandersteg it crosses the Kander. The 47 km long river originates at Kanderfirn and later flows through Lake Thun and into the Aare River. The name Kander comes from the Celtic word “kando” and means “white” or “shining”, a reference to the light cloudiness caused by the glacier’s meltwater. The route follows the course of the river and soon ends at today’s destination, the Kandersteg railway station.
20 km
1150 m | 900 m
6 h 30 min
medium (mountain hiking trail) | difficult

Arrival | return travel

Arrival / return travel Kiental, Post
SBB Timetable Show stop and route on map
Arrival / return travel Kandersteg
SBB Timetable Show stop and route on map

Contact

Signpost management
Signposting is managed by the cantonal hiking trail organisation on behalf of the canton.
Berner Wanderwege
Nordring 8
1303 Bern
info@bernerwanderwege.ch
www.bernerwanderwege.ch

Services

Accommodation

Hotel Spa Restaurant Blausee
Hotel Spa Restaurant Blausee
Blausee-Mitholz
Hotel Victoria Ritter AG
Hotel Victoria Ritter AG
Kandersteg
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Places

Kiental
Kiental
Kandersteg
Kandersteg
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Signalization

Signalization
For hiking, follow the logo indicated on the yellow signposts. Take a printout of our web map on your hike for safety's sake.
Signalization