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Cycling in Switzerland

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Cycling in

Mals (I)
Val Müstair
Val Müstair
Route 27, Zernez–Mals (I)
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Mountain biking in

Mals (I)
Fimberpass - Val d'Uina - Reschenpass
Fimberpass - Val d'Uina - Reschenpass
Trans-Altarezia Bike
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Mals (I)

Mals (I)

The municipality of Mals in the South Tyrol was once known as the «village with seven-towers» because of its seven churches. Lying on an old Roman trading route, it remains a centre for shopping and administration. Traces of its Roman past can only be found in the surrounding area.
Mals was first officially documented in the 11th century; however, Roman settlements had been established along the Via Claudia Augusta long before this. Mals comes from the early Latin word «Mal» which means mountain. The traces of the Roman settlement in Mals have been reburied for conservation purposes and so cannot be viewed but several of the finds are on display in the Schluderns Historical Museum

At one time Mals was known as Seven Churches simply because of its original seven churches. The oldest church is dedicated to St. Benedict and has Carolingian frescoes dating from the 9th century. Represented are ecclesiastic and secular founders. Because of the constant dampness of the walls it is assumed that the church stands on a Rhaetian holy spring. The Romanesque church tower dates from the 12th century. The Maria Himmelfahrt (St. Mary of the Assumption) Parish Church with its Gothic tower from the 16th century can also be viewed in the summer months but the St. Martin, St. Michael, Dreifaltigkeit (Holy Trinity) and Capucine Churches are not open to the public with Mass seldom celebrated there. The St. Johann Church was destroyed during the French invasion in 1799 and only its tower remains.

The castle complex of the Fröhlichsburg was built in the 12th and 13th centuries. It was a guard post on the trading route and seat of the Lords of Fröhlich. Today the castle is a privately owned ruin, however the keep called Fröhlch tower remains in its former state and can be visited. The tower is an impressive 33 metres high. A memorial from more recent history in Mals is dedicated to the fallen from World War I. It has caused local controversy as it was built during the fascist era.

About three kilometres along the Via Claudia August are the two small neighbouring towns of Glurns and Churburg. Their town walls are almost completely preserved and well worth a visit.

Highlights

  • Roman road – the Via Claudia Augusta gives cyclists the chance to ride to Milan along the former Kaiserstrasse.
  • Fröhlicherturm – on request at the tourist office it is possible to climb the Fröhlich tower. Archaeological tours through the region are also available.
  • Natural toboggan run – an 862m-long natural toboggan run is located at Schleis, near Mals.
The municipality of Mals in the South Tyrol was once known as the «village with seven-towers» because of its seven churches. Lying on an old Roman trading route, it remains a centre for shopping and administration. Traces of its Roman past can only be found in the surrounding area.
Mals was first officially documented in the 11th century; however, Roman settlements had been established along the Via Claudia Augusta long before this. Mals comes from the early Latin word «Mal» which means mountain. The traces of the Roman settlement in Mals have been reburied for conservation purposes and so cannot be viewed but several of the finds are on display in the Schluderns Historical Museum

At one time Mals was known as Seven Churches simply because of its original seven churches. The oldest church is dedicated to St. Benedict and has Carolingian frescoes dating from the 9th century. Represented are ecclesiastic and secular founders. Because of the constant dampness of the walls it is assumed that the church stands on a Rhaetian holy spring. The Romanesque church tower dates from the 12th century. The Maria Himmelfahrt (St. Mary of the Assumption) Parish Church with its Gothic tower from the 16th century can also be viewed in the summer months but the St. Martin, St. Michael, Dreifaltigkeit (Holy Trinity) and Capucine Churches are not open to the public with Mass seldom celebrated there. The St. Johann Church was destroyed during the French invasion in 1799 and only its tower remains.

The castle complex of the Fröhlichsburg was built in the 12th and 13th centuries. It was a guard post on the trading route and seat of the Lords of Fröhlich. Today the castle is a privately owned ruin, however the keep called Fröhlch tower remains in its former state and can be visited. The tower is an impressive 33 metres high. A memorial from more recent history in Mals is dedicated to the fallen from World War I. It has caused local controversy as it was built during the fascist era.

About three kilometres along the Via Claudia August are the two small neighbouring towns of Glurns and Churburg. Their town walls are almost completely preserved and well worth a visit.

Highlights

  • Roman road – the Via Claudia Augusta gives cyclists the chance to ride to Milan along the former Kaiserstrasse.
  • Fröhlicherturm – on request at the tourist office it is possible to climb the Fröhlich tower. Archaeological tours through the region are also available.
  • Natural toboggan run – an 862m-long natural toboggan run is located at Schleis, near Mals.

Arrival and return Mals (I)

Adresse

Ferienregion Obervinschgau
St. Benediktstrasse 1
39024 Mals
Tel. +39 0473 831190
info@ferienregion-obervinschgau.it
www.ferienregion-obervinschgau.it

Services

Accommodation

Hotel Garni Oberrhein
Hotel Garni Oberrhein
Rheinfelden - Baden (D)
Raselli Sport Hotel
Raselli Sport Hotel
Le Prese
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Cycling in

Mals (I)
Val Müstair
Val Müstair
Route 27, Zernez–Mals (I)
Show all

Mountain biking in

Mals (I)
Fimberpass - Val d'Uina - Reschenpass
Fimberpass - Val d'Uina - Reschenpass
Trans-Altarezia Bike