Cycling in Switzerland

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Hiking in the surroundings

ViaJura
ViaJura
Stage 2, Aesch (BL)–Laufen
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ViaSurprise
ViaSurprise
Stage 4, Beinwil–Zwingen
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Cycling in the surroundings

Basel–Franches-Montagnes
Basel–Franches-Montagnes
Stage 1, Basel–Delémont
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Dreiland-Radweg
Dreiland-Radweg
Stage 1, Liestal–Rodersdorf
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Chirsi-Route
Chirsi-Route
Route 111, Liestal–Laufen
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Biking in the surroundings

Jura Bike
Grellingen
Customs formalities at «Glögglifels»

Customs formalities at «Glögglifels»

Between Nenzlingen and Pfeffingen, the presumably medieval track from Delsberg to Basel led past the Glögglifels. A negotiable passage was created beneath the Eggfluh. This required massive effort and is unique in the region.
The trail at Glögglifels was probably created in connection with the building or extension of Burg Pfeffingen (castle). The negotiable track was made safer with wheel ruts which prevented carts slipping on the sloping section.

There were two passages, each with a different purpose. While the wider one was used for carts, the narrower one with steps was intended for pedestrians.

On the northern side of the rock and separated by a vertical groove, the coats of arms of Bern and Basel mark the former cantonal boundaries On the south side, grotesque faces and inscriptions make hikers walk a little faster.

This trail made it possible to avoid the customs post at Birs. The two passages were thus closed by gates, anchored at the sides in a channel hewn out of the rock. To pass through, travellers had to summon the keeper by ringing a bell fixed to the rock. The bell (glocke) is said to have given the rock (fels) its name, «Glögglifels».
Between Nenzlingen and Pfeffingen, the presumably medieval track from Delsberg to Basel led past the Glögglifels. A negotiable passage was created beneath the Eggfluh. This required massive effort and is unique in the region.
The trail at Glögglifels was probably created in connection with the building or extension of Burg Pfeffingen (castle). The negotiable track was made safer with wheel ruts which prevented carts slipping on the sloping section.

There were two passages, each with a different purpose. While the wider one was used for carts, the narrower one with steps was intended for pedestrians.

On the northern side of the rock and separated by a vertical groove, the coats of arms of Bern and Basel mark the former cantonal boundaries On the south side, grotesque faces and inscriptions make hikers walk a little faster.

This trail made it possible to avoid the customs post at Birs. The two passages were thus closed by gates, anchored at the sides in a channel hewn out of the rock. To pass through, travellers had to summon the keeper by ringing a bell fixed to the rock. The bell (glocke) is said to have given the rock (fels) its name, «Glögglifels».

Customs formalities at «Glögglifels»

Adresse

Bundesinventar der historischen Verkehrswege der Schweiz (IVS)
www.ivs.admin.ch

Services

Hiking in the surroundings

ViaJura
ViaJura
Stage 2, Aesch (BL)–Laufen
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ViaSurprise
ViaSurprise
Stage 4, Beinwil–Zwingen
Show all

Cycling in the surroundings

Basel–Franches-Montagnes
Basel–Franches-Montagnes
Stage 1, Basel–Delémont
Show all
Dreiland-Radweg
Dreiland-Radweg
Stage 1, Liestal–Rodersdorf
Show all
Chirsi-Route
Chirsi-Route
Route 111, Liestal–Laufen
Show all

Biking in the surroundings

Jura Bike