Cycling in Switzerland

Photo gallery

Hiking in the surroundings

Via Alpina
Via Alpina
Stage 1, Vaduz (Gaflei, FL)–Sargans
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Liechtensteiner Panoramaweg
Liechtensteiner Panoramaweg
Stage 2, Sücka (FL)–Gafadura Hütte (FL)
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Vaduz-Balzers-Weg
Vaduz-Balzers-Weg
Route 975, Vaduz–Balzers, Roxy
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Grüschaweg
Grüschaweg
Route 999, Vaduz–Vaduz
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Fürstensteig
Fürstensteig
Route 994, Gaflei–Gaflei
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Cycling in the surroundings

Lakes Route
Lakes Route
Stage 9, Niederurnen–Buchs (SG)
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Rhine Route
Rhine Route
Stage 3, Chur–Buchs (SG)
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Liechtensteiner Rheintalroute
Liechtensteiner Rheintalroute
Route 35, Sargans–Altstätten
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Fünf-Schlössertour
Fünf-Schlössertour
Route 555, Buchs–Sargans–Vaduz–Buchs
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Biking in the surroundings

Rheintal Bike
Rheintal Bike
Gafadura-Tour
Vaduz
Schloss Vaduz

Schloss Vaduz

Liechtenstein’s landmark holds throne on a rock terrace above Vaduz. It can be seen from far and wide, yet it seems close enough to touch, and it can be reached along a romantic footpath.
The palace is actually a medieval castle that was extended in the 16th and 17th centuries. The first express mention of the castle is preserved in a document where Count Rudolf von Werdenberg-Sargans pledges the castle to Ulrich von Matsch. The then owners – and probably also the builders – were the Counts of Werdenberg-Sargans.

The keep (from the 12th century) and the constructions on the eastern side form the oldest section of the construction. The tower is built on a plot of land of approx. 12 x 13m, and has walls that are up to 4m thick in the first floor. The original entrance was built at a height of 11m on the courtyard side.

The foundations of the St. Anna chapel were probably built in the High Middle Ages. The main altar is Late Gothic. The palace was burnt down by the Swiss in the Swabian War of 1499. The turrets were built between 1529 and 1532. The western side was extended further under Count Kaspar von Hohenems (1613-1640).

The castle has been in the possession of the Princes of Liechtenstein since 1712. For a short time (1712-1732), the palace continued to function as the headquarters of the Landvogtei (bailiwick), but the majority of the building became visibly ruined. Under Prince Johann II, the palace was finally extensively restored in the period between 1905 and 1912, and was later extended to a comfortable condition under Prince Franz Joseph II. The palace has been the permanent residence of the princely family since 1938. The palace is not accessible for the general public.
Liechtenstein’s landmark holds throne on a rock terrace above Vaduz. It can be seen from far and wide, yet it seems close enough to touch, and it can be reached along a romantic footpath.
The palace is actually a medieval castle that was extended in the 16th and 17th centuries. The first express mention of the castle is preserved in a document where Count Rudolf von Werdenberg-Sargans pledges the castle to Ulrich von Matsch. The then owners – and probably also the builders – were the Counts of Werdenberg-Sargans.

The keep (from the 12th century) and the constructions on the eastern side form the oldest section of the construction. The tower is built on a plot of land of approx. 12 x 13m, and has walls that are up to 4m thick in the first floor. The original entrance was built at a height of 11m on the courtyard side.

The foundations of the St. Anna chapel were probably built in the High Middle Ages. The main altar is Late Gothic. The palace was burnt down by the Swiss in the Swabian War of 1499. The turrets were built between 1529 and 1532. The western side was extended further under Count Kaspar von Hohenems (1613-1640).

The castle has been in the possession of the Princes of Liechtenstein since 1712. For a short time (1712-1732), the palace continued to function as the headquarters of the Landvogtei (bailiwick), but the majority of the building became visibly ruined. Under Prince Johann II, the palace was finally extensively restored in the period between 1905 and 1912, and was later extended to a comfortable condition under Prince Franz Joseph II. The palace has been the permanent residence of the princely family since 1938. The palace is not accessible for the general public.

Schloss Vaduz

Adresse

Liechtenstein Center
Städtle 39
9490 Vaduz
Tel. +423 239 63 63
info@liechtenstein.li
www.tourismus.li

Hiking in the surroundings

Via Alpina
Via Alpina
Stage 1, Vaduz (Gaflei, FL)–Sargans
Show all
Liechtensteiner Panoramaweg
Liechtensteiner Panoramaweg
Stage 2, Sücka (FL)–Gafadura Hütte (FL)
Show all
Vaduz-Balzers-Weg
Vaduz-Balzers-Weg
Route 975, Vaduz–Balzers, Roxy
Show all
Grüschaweg
Grüschaweg
Route 999, Vaduz–Vaduz
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Fürstensteig
Fürstensteig
Route 994, Gaflei–Gaflei
Show all

Cycling in the surroundings

Lakes Route
Lakes Route
Stage 9, Niederurnen–Buchs (SG)
Show all
Rhine Route
Rhine Route
Stage 3, Chur–Buchs (SG)
Show all
Liechtensteiner Rheintalroute
Liechtensteiner Rheintalroute
Route 35, Sargans–Altstätten
Show all
Fünf-Schlössertour
Fünf-Schlössertour
Route 555, Buchs–Sargans–Vaduz–Buchs
Show all

Biking in the surroundings

Rheintal Bike
Rheintal Bike
Gafadura-Tour